Lesson 2

2. Was there more continuity than change in British-Jamaican relations between 1760 and 1870?

2. Was there more continuity than change in British-Jamaican relations between 1760 and 1870?

What are we learning about?

As a set piece lesson, this introduces the enquiry question by juxtaposing the revolts of 1760 and 1870 in order to ask ‘how much has changed?’ Taking up the words of an anonymous petitioner of Morant Bay in 1865 – and the recorded speech of George William Gordon, we get students to begin to ask and answer the enquiry question. In support of this they’ll also begin to analyse a timeline they will come to use throughout the enquiry of ‘British-Jamaican relations’.
Students will also be introduced to the different elements of changes in British rule of Jamaica they will be asked to consider; British public attitudes, the ‘West Indian’ economy, the conditions and resistance of the enslaved and the racial justifications for British rule.

Learning Objectives

  • To begin to enquire into the changes to British rule in Jamaica between 1760 and 1870.
  • To analyse the different types of change and continuity between Tacky and Morant Bay.
  • To begin to form a hypothesis as to the extent and nature of change and continuity over this period..

PowerPoint Lesson

Download here – Lesson 2

Suggested Tasks

  • Task A: Speculate on similarities & differences between Tacky’s Revolt and Morant Bay Rebellion
  • Task B: Card sort activity of key dates
  • Task C: Copy down the correct timeline
  • Task D : Take notes on the different themes
  • Task E : Return to timeline and colour code
  • Task F: Write a paragraph giving a hypothesis to the Enquiry Question.

Essential Resources

Key People Notetaker
Student should receive a ‘contacts list’ of the key people – both historical actors and historians – that they will come across during the enquiry. It is up to them to take basic notes on them as and when they encounter them.

Timeline Notetaker
Students should receive a timeline of the key dates of the 100 year period (and beyond) that allow them to develop an overview of the period immediately. This is crucial in order for them to be able to properly consider questions of change & continuity over the period.

Extra Resources